The Power of Story

We tell stories in books, with pictures, with theatre, with spoken word, even with dance. Stories are powerful.

Stories change people.

Why do we tell stories?
From cave paintings to comics, humanity has a wide range of how it tells stories. Every single people’s group uses them, treasures them, and has their own. There are several answers to this.

One, we use them to teach.
Two, we use them to remember.
Three, we use them to dream and invent.

When we use stories to teach, it brings lessons to life. It makes them relatable and real. When we use a creative story to teach, it hides lessons in adventure. We can learn without even knowing that’s what we’re doing.
Do we realize the lessons we are learning? Sometimes we don’t. Be aware of what you are taking in to your heart and mind, it might change you in ways you never realized.

When we tell stories about the past. We keep lessons of experience alive. When we work hard to keep those stories accurate, we protect truth. If we don’t want truth muddied, we must tell our stories. We must search for others’ stories, and we must be open to hearing each one, no matter how difficult.

Make believe. These stories are not true, but can still teach truths. Fiction pushes the envelop. It asks, what if? It lets us learn before we have experienced. Through fiction we invent novel ways of being and understanding. What if humans could fly, breathe underwater, or visit the stars? These dreams of the once impossible have spurred many amazing inventions of today. Many of these dreams started as story.

Jesus Christ also used stories. The Christian Church called them parables and describes them as earthly stories with heavenly meaning. They teach moral truths in ways the average Jewish citizen would have understood in that time period. If Christ himself used stories, we shouldn’t shy from doing the same thing.

Whoever you are, you have a story to tell. No matter what your belief system, it’s an important story.

Tell me a piece of your story in the comments.

©2021 Mary Grace van der Kroef

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8 thoughts on “The Power of Story

  1. It seemed in the past that every family had a story teller. One of the elders of the family. Who told everything they experienced through their life and everything they learned about the family.

    And their stories were more educational than anything you could get in school.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Story telling and story listening both are regulated by the posterior cingulate cortex of our brain and this is also the central node of default mode network (DMN) in the brain.

    It runs on instance guided object learning (IGOL), so our brain automatically connects the dots of a story and makes interesting and pleasant in listening. It happens during film watching.

    Actually, stories propagate knowledge transfer among individuals and from one generation to other generations.

    Thanks! Your post is very informative.
    Learnography
    Happiness Classroom

    Liked by 1 person

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